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1250 South Tamiami Trail, Suite #302
Sarasota, Florida 34239
941.951.2220

sparse-eyebrowBy now, with those little taxicab yellow smiley faces having become iconic, we’ve all had a chance to see how changing the position of the eyebrows on an otherwise bland round face with dots and dashes for features can have a powerful effect on the emotion that face conveys.  (If you use an Emoticon app on your cell phone or tablet, you know how you communicate more effectively with these faces attached to the text.)

The eyebrows are important.  They’re important for you and the look and mood you present to our vision-oriented world.  Standards of beauty change over the decades and right now a lower brow is considered more of the moment, but part of that may be a reaction to the over-arched, over-lifted, “surprised” brows that we’ve come to associate with a “surgical” look.  Also, while low brows on a tired appearing face can make one look more tired, low brows on a fresh appearing face just tend to look sultry -- and we have so many ways to keep a face looking fresh nowadays!  Injectables like BoTox, Dysport and Xeomin -- and fillers too -- can tailor the position of the brows a bit – and “a bit” can make a big difference in your appearance.  All that aside, a healthy, natural looking brow that sits in a position that is most harmonious with your individual facial shape will be the ideal for you. 

This is where I’ve seen the problem come in.  Many of us get so used to looking at ourselves, and the changes that take place over time can be so insidious, that we may lose sight of those changes and how much they affect the mood we project.

Let me share with you a few easily correctable problems that I see again and again in my practice. 

  1. It is not uncommon for the brows to take a little dip at the upper border just a few millimeters before the end that is near your nose.  This can create an artificially angry look and is corrected by filling in that dip with a bit of brow color.  Irrespective of the general shape of your brows, you want the upper border of your brows to have a smooth, gentle curve without dips or points.  Smoothing that contour out has an immediate softening effect on the face and can be easily done with short soft strokes of your brow pencil (or cream or powder),
  2. As we age, the brows can become thinner and horizontally shorter.  A full, healthy brow is both softer and younger looking.  However, our eyes may adjust over the years to the thinner, shorter brow.  If your brows are thin, try creating a fuller brow with your brow color – and give yourself some time to adjust to the new look before deciding that it’s too heavy.  Remember, they don’t need to be darker, just fuller.  Always use short, feathery strokes rather than a hard line.  We don’t want them to look pasted on.
  3. Hold a pencil at the side of your nose and tilt it so it grazes the outer corner of your eye.  Although there are minor variations depending on facial shape, generally the ideal ending point for the tail of the brow will fall where that pencil hits your brow bone.  A lot of women stop their brows short of this point and that can indeed be aging.  Also, keep the tail of the brow lifted if you can, not so that it wings out, but so that it falls more on the top of the brow bone rather than on the lower side where the brow can look “sad”.  If the brow hairs at the tail are rotating downward so that your pencil can’t correct it without looking as though you have two brow tails, you may want a little more help and we can talk.

I hope this was helpful.  As always, if you would like some assistance, give us a call and make an appointment with our wonderful aesthetician, Jill or with me.                

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Published in Blog

It’s been well over a decade now that we’ve come to appreciate the major role that volume loss plays in the appearance of facial aging. But prior to that, the best institutions, the textbooks and the journals were still teaching us that excess fat in the lids was a major culprit and that it needed to be rather enthusiastically removed. Aside from the foundational understanding that we tailor each procedure to the individual and that at least some minor amount of fat removal is a part of many upper and lower lid blepharoplasties, we are a lot smarter now than in decades past about preserving volume around the eyes and lids.

So the short answer to your question is “Yes”. However, we have certainly evolved in our techniques so that should no longer be an issue. Know however, that just having birthdays causes our eyes to sink somewhat. As I’ve discussed (probably ad nauseam to most of my patients), our skulls shrink significantly over time and we can see from imaging reconstructions that the body of the skull gets smaller and all the holes -- that would include the orbits (eye sockets) – get bigger. And that’s part of the reason why our eyes tend to sink back and down, even without any help from an old-fashioned blepharoplasty.

On the other hand, the “sags and bags” of aging lids can make us look and even feel tired or sad; and a well-done blepharoplasty can wake up the entire face and be immensely life-affirming.

Published in Blog

dr barbour

Oculofacial Plastic Surgeon,
Sarasota, Florida

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