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1250 South Tamiami Trail, Suite #302
Sarasota, Florida 34239
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Tuesday, 09 September 2014 15:40

Facelifts for men vs. facelifts for women

One of the facts of life that surprises a lot of my patients (although they invariably say something like, “Oh yeah, that’s right!” when I bring it to their attention) is just another of Mother Nature’s little ironies:

faceliftsAs women age, they tend to become more masculine looking in the face. Features harden and sharpen, and the soft curves of the face of their youth morph into angles.

As men age, they tend to become more feminine looking in the face. The chiseled jaw softens, sometimes into oblivion, and the strong virile features that defined their masculinity in youth seem to melt and sadden.

That is one of the reasons why facelifts, lid surgeries and even BoTox and fillers can go so awry. It’s why women can look “harder” after they’ve had work done and why men can look sort of “weird”. Those of us who treat faces need to understand that you don’t just follow your Doctor Book and approach people like a technician. It is our responsibility to understand the subtle differences that give femininity or masculinity to the face and to be able to translate that into the work we do with our patients.

The aim is to restore softness, sweetness, perhaps even a bit of an angelic look to the woman’s face. On the other hand, the aim with a man is to restore a look of strength and virility to his face. This requires an almost 180 degree turn in our approach to the two genders. And this is one of the ways we make our “work” look natural.

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Q. Sally asks: I read your article about why eyes may get smaller as we age. Can you explain how I should insert and remove my contact lenses? contact lenses small eyes dr. holly barbour

A. The best way to insert soft contact lenses is to place them without stretching the eyelids. The best way to do this is as follows: Place the contact near the tip of your index finger. Make sure it's not too wet - this will allow it to grab onto your eye and not stick on your fingertip when you're trying to insert it. Get in front of a mirror and brace your third or fourth finger on your cheek without pulling down on your eyelid.

Tuck your chin down while looking up into the mirror so you've exposed as much white at the lower part of your eye as possible. Let the contact touch the lower part of the eye and as soon as it "grabs" look up as high as you can (you won't be able to see yourself at this point) and roll your fingertip up slightly to allow the top of the contact to seal onto your eye. It's really easy once you get the hang of it, and it's not that much different than the way people normally insert CL's.

To remove the contact, place the sides of the pads of your fourth fingers together, place them over your contact, and then pinch the pads together a bit to break the seal of the contact with your eye. This way, you can put them in and take them out day after day and year after year without ending up with a saggy lower lid margin down the road.

Q. Sally also noted that her eyes seemed smaller since she began wearing contact lenses about a year ago. Here was my reply:

A. If your eyes seem smaller since you began wearing contact lenses, it may be that the eyes are a little dry. When the eyes are dry we sometimes squint a bit in an unconscious effort to reduce their exposure to the air. If that's the case, you may want to try a contact lens solution that is moisturizing. Opti-Free Replenish is a great solution (no pun intended) for the drying effects of contact lenses. Other than that, contacts should have no effect on the size of your eyes.

Published in Blog
Monday, 14 April 2014 20:24

Product Description: Artefill

A long lasting filler with immediate results. It works with your body's own collagen to give volume that will last years instead of months. artefill

For people who tend to "burn up" filler, Artefill offers a solution for both needle- and credit card-fatigue. This revolutionary volumizer has been around in its present form since 2006, but I have been watching it all these years to make sure of its safety profile.

Twenty per cent of each syringe-full of Artefill is made up of microspheres -- each one being 40 thousandths of a millimeter in diameter -- of polymethylmethacrylate (known by its acronym, PMMA). PMMA is an inert substance that has been used for decades in medicine, for instance in bone glue and the intraocular lenses that are put in the eyes at the time of cataract extractions.

The other 80% is bovine (cow) collagen, which is what most collagen injections were made of back in the 90's. The reason we don't use bovine collagen anymore as a filler is because it doesn’t last more than a few months.

However it has an ionic charge that suspends the PMMA microspheres the perfect distance from each other while they stimulate the body to form its own collagen around them. PS: For those of us who try to live cruelty-free, I've been assured by the company that the collagen is procured from trimming the hooves of this closed herd of cows - a pedicure, if you will.

For those of you who seem to metabolize away anything, take comfort in knowing that 20% of each Artefill treatment just can't be metabolized, so you get to keep it. Some people ask for multiple sessions over time so that the percentage of filler they retain becomes more and more of the entirety of the volume they want.

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dr barbour

Oculofacial Plastic Surgeon,
Sarasota, Florida

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